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The Bilton Hogspital

The Bilton Hogspital

Today’s meeting started at 1030 a.m. with Chairman Richard welcoming members and guests to our Open Meeting.

The speaker today was Teresa who was accompanied by her husband Robert from The Bilton Hogspital.

Teresa spoke about her work with Hedgehogs over a 25 years period. Richard set up the excellent visual aids.

Teresa explained the life cycle of hedgehogs and also about the injuries they sometimes suffered.

The talk was well illustrated with photographs. She did bring a live hedgehog which we saw for about ten minutes. This animal had been with them for rehabilitation and would be returned to its habitat this week.

The main aim of the talk was to make us well aware of this wonderful animal at a time their numbers have plummeted. This once common garden friend is in serious trouble!

We can all help by taking part in Hedgehog Street. Hedgehogs can travel more than a mile each night in order to find enough food or a suitable mate, often passing through several gardens. So we need lots of volunteer Hedgehog Champions to rally the support of their neighbours and create streets full of interconnecting hedgehog-friendly gardens. Visit the website: www.hedgehogstreet.org to join in. For one example a gap of 13 x 13cm gives access to your garden. That is the size of a CD cover. The British Hedgehog Preservation Society provides a leaflet on Creating a Wildlife Garden.

Hibernation is a complicated and often perilous conservation strategy. It is not just ‘going to sleep.’ When asleep all bodily functions remain nearly normal; but in hibernation metabolism is almost at a standstill.

Towards the end of autumn, hedgehogs consider the best places to build nests (called hibernacula). Favourite sites are under hedges and roots of trees, in piles of brushwood, inside compost heaps or in old rabbit burrows and underneath timber buildings and sheds. You can see the dangers! For further information check out www,britishedgehogs.org.uk

Some hedgehogs live to the age of ten.

It was an enjoyable meeting which was well received by all. We now know how we can help this small endangered creature to survive.

The Bilton Hogspital: “Helping Harrogate Hedgehogs …

https://biltonhogspital.blogspot.com/2014/12/helping-harrogate-hedgehogs-general.html

The Bilton Hogspital is a private hedgehog rehabilitation facility based in the Bilton area of Harrogate. It is run by Teresa Marshall, who started caring for hedgehogs in this way in 1995. Although Teresa is listed as a hedgehog carer by the British Hedgehog Preservation Society, the Bilton Hogspital is completely independent, voluntary and unfunded.

The vote of thanks was given by Roy Smith.

The background and History of Sweets

Michael Cochrane opened the meeting and welcomed the members, guests and the speaker Mr Keith Tordoff MBE.

This mornings talk was the The background and History of Sweets.Keith had a table covered in bags of sweets, over twenty packets!

He explained that the Oldest Sweet Shop in the World has been trading continuously since 1827 and this was confirmed by the Guinness Book of records in 2014. The building itself dates from 1661.

Keith told us about the various sweets and their ingredients, often liquorice. He spoke of Pear Drops to Raspberry Bon Bons.

Keith’s talk was entertaining and well received by the audience.

It is worth a look at his web site: www.oldestsweetshop.co.uk for further information.

Chain of Survival

A number of members attended the training session, last Tuesday evening, concerning the new defibrillator.

The Chain of Survival concerns the following:

Early Access – Early CPR – Early Defibrillation – Early Advanced Care.

The St John Ambulance produce a very good First Aid application for your mobile phone. Do have a look at this a pplication! A good one to read and put on your phone.

Defibrillator

The Defibrillator has now been installed. Thanks for all the donations from members and other kind sources.

Derek Simpson’s Funeral

Derek ‘s Funeral Will take place at Skipton Crematorium on Monday 21st January at 2.10pm.

Skipton Crematorium Carleton Rd, Skipton, United Kingdom

Derek Simpson 1937- 2019

Derek Simpson 1937- 2019

The Treasurer Roy Smith informed the membership that our Registrar Derek Simpson had died on Monday 7th January 2019. Derek was a railway man through and through. He had a vast knowledge of the British rail network and the European railways.

His hobbies included walking, skiing and model railways. His layout of train models all complied with British Rail standards. When he retired Derek set himself the task of walking the towpaths of the English Canal system. He had no intention of becoming a ‘couch potato’!

In his library he had all the Ordinance Survey maps of England. Derek was a good skier and taught many folk to ski when there was a dry ski slope in Harrogate.

When out walking he always had the company of Fran or Meg his well behaved dogs.

He will be missed by many friends and colleagues.



Gordon Middleton

6 days ago
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Derek Simpson 1937- 2019
Hi. My name is Gordon Middleton and I am Derek Simpson’s nephew. First of all I’d like to thank your members for their kind words regarding Derek’s life.
Any friends and colleagues who wish to attend his funeral are informed that on Monday 21st, 2.10pm It will be held at Skipton Crematorium then onto Carleton Social club about a mile away in Carleton village. Everybody is welcome.

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An Egyptian Odyssey

Mrs Jocelyn Brooks An Egyptian Odyssey

Mrs Brooks gave an interesting presentation about the importance of the River Nile to Egypt. It was illustrated with photographs of some of the temples and the wonders of the ancient world.
Without the Nile river, all of Egypt would be desert. Only about a 2.5cm of rain falls throughout Egypt each year. In summer, the Nile river level rises with water from it’s source in Ethiopia. The land in the Nile valley floods, enabling crops and trees to grow.

Egypt was founded 3150 BC by King Menes, leading to a series of dynasties that ruled Egypt for the next three millennia. The culture flourished during this long period and remained distinctively Egyptian in its religion, arts, language and customs.

Many of the members of the Forum had visited Egypt. The vote of thanks was given by Roger Bancroft. 36 members attended.

Concorde: Up in Flames

Mr Duncan Verity: Concorde: Up in Flames

First meeting of the new season chaired by Mike Cochrane.
Tribute to 3 time Chairman and life member Roy Howard (d. 2/6/18) by John Taylor.
Outline of new banking arrangements and short financial update by Roy Smith. Audited accounts to follow.

Duncan verity from Wetherby MF gave a competent presentation; but a horrendous one. Duncan introduced a National Geographic DVD about the fatal crash of an Air France Concorde airliner on take-off at Paris Charles de Gaulle Airport in 2001, which killed all 109 passengers and 4 people on the ground. Firstly we were shown a dramatic reconstruction of the moments before the crash from the point of view of the devastated traffic controller, who first noticed flames coming from the aircraft. Then we followed in detail the twists and turns of the Air France investigation during which all Concordes were grounded. There were 3 major clues – a ruptured tyre, a shattered fuel tank and a mysterious strip of metal. It transpired that the metal strip came off an American DC10 which had left a few minutes before Concorde. Tests showed that the Concorde fuel tank had shattered from the inside out on contact with the strip. Concorde flights were resumed but were abandoned in November 2003. The cost running “the beautiful white Supersonic bird” had become uneconomic.

Mr Verety explained, however, that many experts consider that some additional issues were not addressed. For example the 6 tons of extra weight which Concorde was carrying above its recommended load. These and other questions led to some interesting comments from members. Mike Cochrane gave the vote of thanks and recalled a visit to Filton in the 1960s when he saw Concorde being built.

Quiz

We had a substitutes bench today: the Deputy Chairman was Richard and the speaker was Geoff Queen.
The Deputy Chairman welcomed the ladies to this open meeting and advised that three apologies had been received.
The programmed speaker Tim Fee was unable to attend. Geoff Queen was thanked for substituting at short notice.

Geoff displayed pictures from the UK and the Isle of Man. He tested the members of the forum’s knowledge with a photographic quiz.

The slides started with ones of pictures from Yorkshire and became more difficult as the talk progressed.
The pictures covered landscapes, castles and churches from different areas of the British Isles.
The Forum members were on form it was a whitewash!

Some questions were asked and Geoff said his favourite Cathedral was Hereford.

The vote of thanks was given by Tom Snelling. The proceeds of the talk today were in aid of Great Ormond Street Hospital.

PS
Richard Wright took the chair and welcomed 31 members and 9 ladies to the meeting. He explained how grateful we were to our old friend Geoff Queen for stepping in when Tim Fee was unable to attend. Geoff has raised over £11000 for Great Ormond Street Hospital through his talks and in total we gave him around £85 after today’s meeting as fee plus generous donations from our members.

Unusually Geoff’s talk was close to home and in the form of a quiz to see how many well-known places in Great Britain we could recognise. On nearly every occasion we won the contest with Tony Bills being exceptionally knowledgeable (even remembering the gaelic name of a mountain in Glencoe). Starting with Knaresborough railway bridge we were taken through familiar Yorkshire landmarks from Bolton Abbey to Whitby Harbour, then processed around the country to some of Geoff’s favourite places from Liverpool where he enjoyed the Scouse humour when working there to Worcester where he had combined his love of cricket with his love of Cathedral music on the same day. One of his favourite images was Barmouth railway bridge with the Welsh peaks including Cader Idris behind. Altogether we recognised over 40 places and finished our journey seasonally with the crocuses on Harrogate Stray.

We also enjoyed two splendid anecdotes. Richard told us about the horticulturist who was nearly arrested for terrorist offences and Geoff told us how the cricket writer Neville Cardus treated his wedding as a small interlude in a slow day’s batting by Lancashire at Old Trafford.

Report 13th February 2018

FORUM 13 FEB The Chairman welcomed 39 members to the meeting and announced the sad news of the death of Roland Moor, a friend of Roy Howard and George Wells and a former member of the Forum. Our speaker Chris Helme from Brighouse is a former police officer but his subject was “Other People’s Rubbish”. He alluded in an amusing introduction to the way that men hoard bits of plugs, wires and pieces of wood in their sheds in the mistaken belief that they will be useful one day. Women hoard buttons in the same way. He collects items that other people would throw away – old 78s and EPs, tapes, council minute books and newspapers for significant dates that reveal bits of local history such as a proposal to name a local street after Elvis that would otherwise be forgotten. Chris is a keen local historian and wrote a column for the local press for 30 years on the nostalgia theme, drawing his material from his collection saved from the skip or bought for a few pence. To show that he is not a stick in the mud, he told us that he has run a class helping older people to use mobile phones. Many of us had to admit that we mostly keep our phones switched off – typical apparently! Chris could have talked for hours but we had to call proceedings to a halt at 11.50!